News & Events Archives — 2008

La Veterinaire, bimonthly news magazine
2008 issues

 

SVM Updates, monthly e-mail newsletter
2008 issues

2008 Press Releases


LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Confers Three Advanced Degrees

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine conferred three graduate degrees at its Diploma Distribution Ceremony for the Graduate Academic Studies Program on December 19.

Dr. Peter F. Haynes, dean of the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, greeted the guests and presided over the ceremony.  Dr. Stephen D. Gaunt, professor of veterinary clinical pathology, served as the representative of the LSU Graduate Council and conferred the degrees.

Attending the Diploma Distribution Ceremony at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine are (from left to right) Dr. Dale Paccamonti, head of Veterinary Clinical Sciences; Dr. Sara Lyle, PhD recipient and instructor in theriogenology; Dr. Arun Venkatesh Iyer, PhD recipient; Dr. Konstantin G. Kousoulas, professor in Pathobiological Sciences; Dr. Steve Gaunt, professor in Pathobiological Sciences, representing the LSU Graduate School; and Dean Peter F. Haynes.

Salim Alawneh (Irbid, Jordan), received his PhD degree from the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. His dissertation title is, “The Zinc Induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 Gene Promoter in Mouse Hepa Cells.” His major professor is James Miller, DVM, MPVM, PhD, professor of epidemiology and community health.

Arun Venkatesh Iyer, MSc, MA (Kalyan, India), received his PhD degree from the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. His dissertation title is, “Phylogenetics and New Approaches to Vaccine Development for West Nile Virus.” Iyer’s major professor is Konstantin G. Kousoulas, MS, PhD, professor of veterinary virology and director of the Division of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine.

Sara Lyle, DVM, MS (Baton Rouge, La.), received her PhD degree from the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Her dissertation title is, “The Relationship between Pro-inflammatory Cytokines, Prostaglandins, and Fetal Hypothalmic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Activation in Mares with Infective Pre-term Delivery.” Dr. Lyle’s major professor is Dale Paccamonti, DVM, MS, DACT, head of the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and professor of theriogenology. Dr. Lyle is also an instructor of theriogenology at the LSU SVM.

Also recognized were four graduates who received their degrees in August 2008.

Robert Rouse, DVM, MBA (Lake Charles, La.), received his PhD degree from the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences. His dissertation title is, “The Effects of In Utero Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure on Immune Responses to Allergen in Adult Offspring.” Dr. Rouse’s major professor is Arthur L. Penn, MA, PhD, professor of toxicology.

Haixia Kong, DVM (Zhenjiang, Jiangsu, China), received her MS degree from the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. Her thesis is entitled, “Molecular Determinants of Kaposi’s Saracoma-Associated Herpesvirus Tumorigenicity.” Dr. Kong’s major professor is Konstantin G. Kousoulas, MS, PhD, professor of veterinary virology and director of the Division of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine.

Hyun Cheol Lee (Seoul, Korea), received his MS degree from the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. His thesis is entitled, “Comparative Roles of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Viral glycoproteins in Cytoplasmic Virion Egress.” Dr. Kong’s major professor is Konstantin G. Kousoulas, MS, PhD, professor of veterinary virology and director of the Division of Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine.

Jose Len, MVZ (Panama City, Panama), received his MS degree from the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. His dissertation title is, “Effects of Centrifugation on Equine Spermatozoa Immediately and after Cooling for 24 Hours.” Dr. Len’s major professor is Bruce E. Eilts, DVM, MS, DACT, professor of theriogenology.

“This is an important day for the School of Veterinary Medicine,” said Dean Haynes. “We are grateful for the efforts of these graduates and know that their endeavors will serve to enhance not only their own reputations, but the reputation of the School of Veterinary Medicine as well.”


LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Hosts 27th Annual Open House Saturday, February 7

 

Visitors to Open House watch a demonstration of the equine treadmill.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine will host its 27th Annual Open House on Saturday, February 7, 2009, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. This year’s theme is Where’s Mike? Photographs of Mike the Tiger will be hidden along the Paw Print Trail that takes visitors through the Veterinary Medicine Building. The spirit of Mike the Tiger is everywhere, just as veterinarians touch many different aspects of life aside from pet care (e.g., military, food safety, animal welfare, and biomedical research).

Open House 2009 is an opportunity for everyone in the family to explore the fantastic world of veterinary medicine and the latest developments in animal health care, welfare, and research. A self-guided tour will take visitors through the Veterinary Medicine Building where students, faculty, and staff will provide information and exhibits on various facets of the veterinary medicine curriculum. In addition, the gross anatomy laboratory, intensive care units, surgery suites, and radiology suites will be featured on the tour, along with other areas of the veterinary hospital. There will also be a teddy bear repair station where children can get their stuffed animals “sutured,” a petting zoo and animal demonstrations, such as a parade of breeds of both dogs and horses.

Equine treadmill demonstrations will be held throughout the day behind the Equine Research Building. Also continuing throughout the day are the companion animal underwater treadmill demonstrations at the CARe-Center and tours of the Cancer Treatment Unit in the Small Animal Clinic.

Erin Daniels and Lauren Orvin, third-year veterinary students and event chairs; and SVM faculty and staff will be available for live interviews throughout the day.

For more information, call Gretchen Morgan at (225) 578-9900 or visit the School’s website at www.vetmed.lsu.edu.


LSU Veterinary Students Visit Walker High School and Provide Service to Walker Animal Shelter

On November 13, Dr. Wendy Wolfson (left) instructed fourth-year veterinary students (from left) Liz Hughs, Doty Kempf, and Mitzi Clark as they treated animals at the Walker Animal Shelter in Walker, La. The students also gave a presentation on zoonotic diseases to a biology class at Walker High School.

On November 13, three veterinary students, a community wellness coordinator, and a veterinary instructor visited Walker High School (Walker, La.) so that the veterinary students could give a presentation on zoonoses to a biology class (zoonoses are diseases of animals transmissible to humans). Fourth-year veterinary students Mitzi Clark, Doty Kempf, and Liz Hughs each spoke to the high school students about diseases that can be passed from animals to humans.

Fourth-year veterinary students Mitzi Clark (left) and Doty Kempf assist Dr. Wendy Wolfson at the Walker Animal Shelter in Walker, La. The LSU SVM offers a shelter medicine course for veterinary students who have started their clinical rotations.

Clark discussed parasites such as hookworm, roundworm, and ringworm, and Hughs discussed mites, scabies, mange, and cat scratch fever. Kempf’s presentation covered fleas, tapeworms, and rabies.

“My students are studying diseases right now, and all they could talk about were the diseases discussed by the veterinary students,” said Dottie Hartman, science teacher at Walker High School. “This really made an impact and will stay with these students for a long time. They definitely got the message about the importance of regular check-ups for pets and keeping animals free of disease.”

After visiting the high school, the students accompanied Dr. Wendy Wolfson, instructor, to the Walker Animal Shelter, where they assisted Dr. Wolfson in deworming dogs, checking them for heartworms, and performing medical examinations. The shelter medicine curriculum at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine provides veterinary students with the opportunity to learn about animal shelters while providing vital medical care to shelters in south Louisiana. This program is sponsored in part by a grant from the Humane Society of the United States.


Veterinary Student Finalist for National Business Award

Marc Bordelon

Marc Bordelon, fourth-year veterinary student, was a finalist for the Simmons Educational Fund National Business Aptitude Award and will receive $1,000 from Simmons & Associates. The winner this year is Nina Kieves from the University of Minnesota.

“Simmons & Associates received numerous entries from all over the United States, and it was very tough just to choose one winner,” said David King, DVM, Simmons & Associates South Central. “However, Marc Bordelon's entry impressed the SEF board so much that we elected to send him a $1,000 check for the effort. LSU should be very proud. You have competed among the nation's finest and have done very well. LSU had the national winner with Brad Singletary two years ago, last year Leslie Andermann was a finalist and received $1,000, and now Marc has done the same. I am very impressed with what I see from LSU; whatever you are doing — keep it up.”

The mission of the SEF Business Aptitude Award is as follows:
• The award is offered to a third-year veterinary student at each veterinary school in the United States.
• The awards are presented at each school's spring awards ceremonies.

• Recipients are chosen either by a school committee or by a Simmons & Associates Inc. regional owner.
• All $2000 award winners are automatically eligible to compete for the National Business Aptitude Award.
• All competing regional winners are required to submit a resume and a short essay.
• The National Business Aptitude Award winner is selected by the Simmons Educational Fund board.

Next year, the Simmons Educational Fund plans to increase the awards to $3,000 to each participating veterinary school and $15,000 to the national winner. That means that the SEF plans to give over $100,000 to students in 2009.


LSU Veterinary School Honors Human-Animal Bond at Sculpture Dedication

Connections, a bronze water sculpture honoring people who come to the aid of animals, was unveiled in a ceremony at the SVM on November 6.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine dedicated Connections, a bronze statue to honor those who come to the aid of animals.

“Although, the rescue, shelter, and reunification of animals in the aftermath of hurricanes reveals the depth of the human-animal bond in all people, the sculpture represents the basis of the veterinary profession and relation we all share with the animals in our lives,” said Dr. David Senior, associate dean for advancement and strategic initiatives. The dedication took place on November 6 at the LSU SVM.

Connections depicts a young girl offering water to a thirsty cat and dog representing both the relationship and responsibility we all share with domestic animals. “This sculpture illustrates the importance of animals in our lives, which was seen time and time again after the hurricanes as people refused to evacuate without their pets,” said Dean Peter F. Haynes. “In the 1950s the pet was consigned to the yard; by the 1960s the pet had been allowed in the house; by the 1970s the pet was allowed to sleep in the bedroom; now they may even be under the blankets. With companion animals owned by more than two-thirds of our family households…today, our focus is on the human-animal bond and the importance of animals in the lives of so many people.”

This one-of-a-kind artwork, designed by Kentucky sculptor Meg White, is a central part of the Milton J. Womack Serenity Garden. Donated by the Womack family and dedicated in memory of the late Milton J. Womack, Sr., the Serenity Garden is located near the Small Animal Clinic entrance of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Landscaped by LSU landscape architecture graduate students, it provides a peaceful spot for reflection. The Serenity Garden can also serve to honor special people and pets through the placement of an engraved pavement brick.

Participating in the dedication ceremony were President Emeritus William Jenkins; Provost Astrid Merget; Dean Peter Haynes; Agriculture Commissioner Dr. Mike Strain; Ms. Margaret Womack; Mr. Terry Hill, president of Milton J. Womack Construction, Inc.; and Mr. Rick Lipscomb with WHLC Architects, the company that designed the Serenity Garden. “We are here to celebrate the unveiling and the dedication of a piece of art that represents what veterinary medicine and the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine as an institution stand for,” said Dr. Jenkins. “What sets veterinary medicine apart from other professions is that it is a caring profession. This sculpture is a symbolic representation of the profession and the School of Veterinary Medicine.”

After a brief program inside, everyone walked out to the Serenity Garden, where Womack, Hill, and Lipscomb each removed one of three drapes covering the three elements of the sculpture. Womack revealed the dog, which was based on her own dog, Pepper. Hill revealed the cat, and Lipscomb revealed the young girl. Said Dr. Senior, “This sculpture will serve as an iconic symbol of the School of Veterinary Medicine for years to come.”


LSU Veterinary School Honors Two Alumni with Distinguished Alumnus Award

Dean Peter F. Haynes (right) presents a posthumous Distinguished Alumnus Award for Dr. Mary Louise Martin to Dr. & Mrs. Jim Bob Ourso, Dr. Martin’s brother-in-law and sister. Dr. Martin lost her life in the terrorist bombing of the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi on August 7, 1998.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine honored two alumni at its 77th Annual Conference for Veterinarians and Veterinary Technicians with the Distinguished Alumnus Award. The recipients are Dr. Mary Louise Martin (LSU 1982) and Dr. Debra Sellon (LSU 1983).

Dr. Martin was a graduate of St. Joseph’s Academy in Baton Rouge. She received her DVM from the LSU SVM in 1982, and followed with an MS in genetics from LSU. She studied at the Woods Hole Institute and did an internship at the University of Pennsylvania, where she specialized in cardiology.

Dr. Martin was the first veterinarian to be selected for a fellowship by Children’s Hospital in Boston. In 1985, she went to work at the Centers for Disease Control, where she was head of the congenital birth defects section. Dr. Martin sang with the Metropolitan Opera Chorus while living in Atlanta. She was president of the Junior League of DeKalb County and was a lobbyist for the Junior League in Washington.

In 1995, Dr. Klaucke, Dr. Martin’s husband, was assigned to Kenya to work in a polio immunization program for the World Health Organization. Dr. Martin left her job at the CDC, and the family moved to Nairobi, Kenya. In Nairobi, Dr. Martin was working as the director of the Jimmy Carter Foundation in the fight against malaria. She was a pilot and became a Medivac pilot while in Africa. Dr. Martin lost her life in the terrorist bombing of the U.S. embassy in Nairobi on August 7, 1998.

Dr. Becky McConnico accepts the Distinguished Alumnus award on behalf of Dr. Debra Sellon.

Dr. Sellon is an outstanding educator, as evidenced by numerous teaching awards. In addition to her lectures, labs and clinical duties at Washington State University, where she is associate dean of the Graduate School, she mentors interns, ACVIM resident candidates, and doctoral students.

Dr. Sellon has excelled in several areas of research beginning with studies in Equine Infectious Anemia at North Carolina State University and going on to research concentrations at WSU in immunology and immune suppression in animals. She has developed an international reputation. Her studies involving Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis are cutting edge and continue to provide greater insights into the pathogenesis of this crippling disease in horses. She is a successful grantsman with over $2 million in extramural funding, including awards from the NIH.

Dr. Sellon has published over 55 manuscripts in peer reviewed journals, contributed to many publications and book chapters, and is currently co-editor of the textbook Equine Internal Medicine. These scholarly contributions to the literature are further examples of her dedication to academics.

Dr. Sellon holds awards for leadership, excelling on both local and national levels with her service on committees at WSU, North Carolina State University, the American Association of Equine Practitioners, the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine, and the American Veterinary Medical Association. She has always been a passionate champion for her alma mater and the profession.

The Distinguished Alumnus Award is a means to recognize alumni of the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine for outstanding professional and personal achievements. The award is presented at the Annual Conference each year. Any veterinarian who received the Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree from Louisiana State University before 1998 is eligible for the award. Candidates will be recognized for their accomplishments in veterinary medicine and/or contributions to the community through public service. Previous winners include Dr. Robert Lewis (LSU 1977), Elgin, Texas, 1990 recipient; Drs. Larry McCaskill (LSU 1981), Oscar, La., Mark Mikelonis (LSU 1988), Covington, La., and Jim Floyd (LSU 1987), Pittsboro, N.C., 1991 recipients; Dr. Allen J. Roussel (LSU 1977), College Station, Texas, 1992 recipient; Dr. Mike Strain (LSU 1983), Covington, La., 2003 recipient; Dr. Alfred Stevens (LSU 1979), Baton Rouge, La., 2004 recipient; Dr. Gregory Rich (LSU 1985), Kenner, La., 2005 recipient; Dr. Mary Boudreaux (LSU 1979), Auburn, Ala., 2006 recipient; and Dr. Robert D. Simmons (LSU 1977), 2007 recipient.


Pet Photos with Santa Paws at LSU Veterinary School

Bring your pet – any pet – to meet Santa Paws! Pets can have their picture taken with Santa Paws on Sunday, November 9 from 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine on Skip Bertman Drive in Baton Rouge, La.

This annual event is sponsored by the Auxiliary to the Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association and helps fund scholarships for veterinary school students. A variety of photo packages are available. The family is welcome to pose with Santa Paws in the picture. Pets Believe Too!

For more information, contact the School of Veterinary Medicine at (225) 578-9900 or click here to download price list.


LSU Veterinary Professor Receives Visionary Award

Dr. Dennis McCurnin

Dr. Dennis McCurnin, professor of veterinary surgery in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, received the 2008 SWVS Visionary Award at the Southwest Veterinary Symposium during the Alumni/Student Reception on October 4. This award is presented each year to the individual who is recognized by their profession and is actively engaged in the private, public, or corporate practice of veterinary medicine and whose contributions have aided in elevating the standards and goals of veterinary medicine. This is accomplished by a variety of contributions to the industry that include veterinary practice, veterinary medical association involvement, continuing education, papers, publications, public education, civic activities, and a variety of other accomplishments. Nominees are submitted from the five SWVS partner states and the SWVS Awards Committee selects the winner. The Southwest Veterinary Symposium is a partnership combining the efforts of the Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas Veterinary Medical Associations to provide exceptional continuing education for veterinary professional in the southwest region and the rest of the nation.

“This award was a total surprise and is very meaningful to me,” said Dr. McCurnin. “I have always felt a responsibility to return something to the profession and working in support of professional organizations is my way of contributing back to our great profession. I found early on that being involved in and planning continuing education was my forte. I have been very lucky to have served the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Western Veterinary Conference, the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, and the Southwest Veterinary Symposium in the area of continuing education. I always received back much more than I gave, so being recognized for something that I love to do was very nice. I can only say, ‘Thank you.’”


LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Animals in Art Show Calls for Entries

For more information about the Art Show, click here.

To download an entry form, click here.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine will hold the 22nd Annual International Exhibition on Animals in Art beginning with an opening reception on March 28, 2009, and concluding on April 26, 2009.

Judge and Juror for this year’s event will be Melanie Hansbrough. Melanie is an artist from Baton Rouge, La., and graduated from Louisiana State University in 1972. She has studied with Janie McWhorter, Ed Pramuk, Della Storm, Meghan Clark, Michael Crespo, Stephanie DeManuelle, Van Wade-Day, Marcus McAllister, and Libby Johnson. Most of Melanie’s work is oil, pen and ink, watercolor, and collage. Her work has been exhibited at Dixon Smith Interiors, Ann Connelly Fine Art Gallery, and Unique Visions in Baton Rouge, as well as Custom Linens in New Orleans, La.; Gallery Expose in Seaside, Fla.; and Basmatis in Blue Mountain Beach, Fla. Melanie’s work has been published in How to Make an Oil Painting by Michael Crespo, and her work was featured on the original cover of best-selling national cookbook, A Trim and Terrific Louisiana Kitchen by Holly Berkowitz Clegg.

The exhibition is open to all artists 18 years of age or older. All media are welcomed and accepted; the work must be original. A $1,000 Best of Show award will be given and one entry will be chosen to appear on the cover of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association.

“The Dog’s Chair,” an acrylic by Marjie Bassler of Albuquerque, N.M., received the SVM Program Award at the 2008 International Exhibition on Animals in Art.

All work must be priced and for sale, and a 20% commission will be taken on all sales. Works must meet the spirit of the “Animals in Art” exhibit in order to be considered for acceptance. Selection of works to be accepted in the exhibition will be chosen from 2" x 2" mounted 35mm slides or digital images on a compact disk. Only one slide or digital image should be submitted for each 2-dimensional work, and a maximum of three slides or digital images may be submitted for a 3-dimensional work. Each slide or compact disk must be labeled with name, title, medium, and each slide must indicate the top of the artwork. The maximum size for entry is 60"x60"x48".

A non-refundable fee of $15.00 for each entry must accompany the entry form. A check or money order should be made payable to Louisiana State University with the notation “Animals in Art Entry” in the memo line. Entries are due by January 9, 2009.

Those interested in participating should contact Gretchen Morgan, alumni & public programs coordinator for the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, for an entry form and additional information at (225) 578-9565 or by e-mail at gmorgan@lsu.edu. Information is also available at the School’s Web site at www.vetmed.lsu.edu.


Veterinary Teaching Hospital Seeks Dogs for Chronic Renal Disease Clinical Study

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is conducting clinical research examining the ability of a specific HMG CoA Reductase Inhibitor to slow the progression of canine chronic kidney disease. This groundbreaking research, which has been funded by the American Kennel Club, is being conducted in collaboration with the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine, Arizona Veterinary Specialists in Gilbert, Ariz., and Veterinary Specialists of South Florida in Cooper City, Fla. Additional studies centers are anticipated in the next few months.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is looking for dogs with chronic kidney disease to participate in this 12-month study. Patients are currently being enrolled. In order to support this important research, the Nestle Purina Pet Care Company has agreed to provide all participants its specially formulated renal failure diet for the duration of the study.

To refer chronic kidney disease patients for participation in this study, please contact Dr. Mark Acierno, assistant professor of companion animal medicine, at (225) 578-9600.

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Announces Phi Zeta Research Emphasis Day Award Winners 

Winners of awards at the Phi Zeta Research Emphasis Day are (from left to right) Jeffrey Cardinale, Matthew Rogge, Kathryn Reif, Dr. Brooke Grasperge, Laura D’Amico, Soma Chowdhury, and Diana Babin.

On September 24, the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine held its annual Phi Zeta Research Emphasis Day—a day established to promote research in schools of veterinary medicine, to recognize research conducted by veterinary students, residents, graduate students and faculty, and to encourage veterinary students to pursue careers in research. Phi Zeta is the national veterinary honor society, which recognizes and furthers scholarship and research in matters pertaining to the welfare and diseases of animals. The importance of this day to the SVM is underlined by the fact that the Veterinary Teaching Hospital is closed except for emergencies to allow all students and house officers to participate.

Phi Zeta Day provides an opportunity for national experts to speak to students on current research in various fields and to present a picture of global veterinary research. This year’s speakers were Kevin Schultz, DVM, PhD, University Distinguished Professor, Department of Pathobiology and Diagnostic Investigation, College of Veterinary Medicine, Michigan State University; and Guy H. Palmer, DVM, PhD, Professor and Director, Immunology Training Program, Washington University. Dr. Schultz discussed “From Practice to Consulting: A Veterinary Experience,” and Dr. Palmer gave his presentation on “Global Health and the Animal-Human Interface.”

Veterinary and graduate students (including interns and residents) and faculty and staff presented their current biomedical research that is relevant to diseases of man and animals. Student entries were made in two categories: the doctoral student competition and the undergraduate, Master’s degree, and House Officer competition. First-, second- and third-place monetary awards were given in these categories. This year there were 17 entries in the doctoral student competition and 28 in the undergraduate, Master’s degree and House Officer category.

Winners in the Student competition, including Master’s, undergraduate and veterinary students, and interns and residents were as follows. First place went to Soma Chowdhury, Master’s degree student in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences, for “Rickettsial infection and role of innate immune response of in skin tissues of mice during tick bite.” Chowdhury’s faculty mentor was Dr. Kevin Macaluso, assistant professor in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. Second place went to Dr. Brooke Grasperge, laboratory animal resident, for “Microbiological monitoring of sealed versus unsealed barn floors using RODAC bacterial culture plates” and to Laura D’Amico, fourth-year veterinary student, for “Evaluation of relationships between acetabulum/femoral head volume ratios and both hip joint laxity and osteoarthritis in lax canine hips from youth to maturity.” Dr. Grasperge’s faculty mentor was Dr. David Baker, director of the Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine, and D’Amico’s faculty mentor was Dr. Mandi Lopez, assistant professor in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. Third place went to Diana Babin, a third-year veterinary student, for “Determination of a caprine humoral antibody response against cholera toxin B expressed in a transgenic plant vaccine.” Babin’s faculty mentor was Dr. Phillip Elzer, professor of veterinary science.

Winners in the Ph.D. category were as follows. First place went to Jeffrey Cardinale, a PhD student in the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences, for “HDAC inhibition attenuates hypertensive and hypertrophic response elements in left ventricle of spontaneously hypertensive rats.” Cardinale’s major professor is Dr. Joseph Francis, associate professor in the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences. Second place went to Matthew Rogge, a PhD student in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences, for “Environmental pH and phosphate concentration regulate expression of the E. ictaluri type III secretion system.” Rogge’s faculty mentor was Dr. Ronald Thune, professor and head of the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. Third place went to Kathryn Reif, a PhD student in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences, for “Prevalence and infection load dynamics of Rickettsia felis in activity feeding cat fleas.” Reif’s major professor is Dr. Kevin Macaluso, assistant professor in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences.

Phi Zeta would like to take this opportunity to thank the poster judges: Greg Bagby, PhD, Kai and Earl Rozas Professor of Physiology, LSU Department of Physiology; Ann A. Coulter, PhD, Senior Scientist, Celgene Cellular Therapeutics; Jeff Gimble, MD, PhD, Professor, Pennington Biomedical Research Center; Jan M. Hondzinski, PhD, Associate Professor, LSU Dept. of Kinesiology; Don Ingram, PhD , Professor, Pennington Biomedical Research Center; Indu Kheterpal (Gilman), Assistant Professor - Research, Pennington Biomedical Research Center; Barbara Kozak, PhD, Assistant Professor, Pennington Biomedical Research Center; Mary Beth Lima, PhD, Design Professor, LSU Dept. of Biology & Agricultural Engineering; Patricia Molina, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Physiology, LSU Health Sciences Center; Barry Robert, DVM, Ph.D., DACLAM, Director, Comparative Biology Core, Pennington Biomedical Research Center; and Deborah Wilson, PhD, COO, Qyntessa Biologics. Special thanks also go to the event sponsors: Bayer Animal Health Division, Fort Dodge Animal Health, Heska Corporation, Hill’s Pet Nutrition, Merial, Nestlé-Purina, Novartis Animal Health, Pfizer Animal Health, Royal Canin, and Schering-Plough Animal Health.

“The SVM annual fall research emphasis day sponsored and organized by Phi Zeta has become an important aspect of our research culture. It gives us an opportunity to showcase the research activities of our scientists and to recognize our students for their efforts with significant awards,” said Dr. Thomas R. Klei, associate dean for Research and Advanced Studies at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine.

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LSU Veterinary School Honors Hurricane Volunteers and Donors at Sculpture Unveiling

Maquette of Connections, the bronze statue that will stand in the SVM's Serenity Garden outside the Small Animal Clinic. Connections honors the people who have helped animals in need in the aftermath of hurricanes.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine will dedicate Connections, a bronze statue to honor the people who support animals in need, which is epitomized by the rescue, shelter, and reunification of animals in the aftermath of hurricanes. This sculpture will be dedicated on Thursday, November 6 at 3:30 p.m. in the School of Veterinary Medicine’s Serenity Garden near the entrance to the Small Animal Clinic.

Connections depicts a young girl offering water to a thirsty cat and dog, representing both the relationship and responsibility we all share with domestic animals. “This sculpture illustrates the importance of animals in our lives, which was seen time and time again after the hurricanes as people refused to evacuate without their pets,” said Dean Peter F. Haynes. “This sculpture is dedicated to all of those people who braved high waters and dangerous situations to rescue animals and to the thousands of people who supported and cared for those animals after they were taken from harm’s way. It stands as a memorial to their grace, perseverance and dedication.”

This one-of-a-kind artwork, designed by Kentucky sculptor Meg White, is a central part of the Milton J. Womack Serenity Garden. Donated by the Womack family and dedicated in memory of the late Milton J. Womack, Sr., the Serenity Garden is located near the Small Animal Clinic entrance of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Landscaped by LSU landscape architecture graduate students, it provides a peaceful spot for reflection.

Participating in the dedication ceremony will be President Emeritus William Jenkins, Dean Peter Haynes and Ms. Margaret Womack. All hurricane volunteers and the public are invited to attend.

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LSU’s Mobile Emergency Response Unit Provides Veterinary Care for Hard-Hit Areas
 

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s emergency response unit was mobilized following Hurricane Gustav to provide veterinary care to areas affected by the storm. The unit was taken to Houma last week and will be at the Petsmart on Martin Luther King Dr. in Houma, La., on Monday, September 8.

In June 2006, the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery (AKC CAR) established the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery Emergency Response Unit Fund. In response to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine (LSU SVM) partnered with the AKC CAR to develop a mobile response unit that can be used to respond to any natural disaster in which small animals are left injured or abandoned. The AKC CAR is providing partial funding for the purchase and equipping of a mobile unit. The LSU SVM is providing a vehicle to pull the unit, staffing for the unit, and necessary supplies.

This unit will be used for emergency response and will serve as an active component of an integrated system for responding to natural disasters. This unit will also significantly enhance the ability of the LSU SVM to provide immediate care to injured, dehydrated, or otherwise debilitated animals.

During the interim, when the mobile unit is not being used for disasters, it will be used as part of the Southeast Louisiana Spay/Neuter/Animal and Community Wellness student elective to provide spay and neuter services to animal shelters participating in the program that do not have surgical facilities.

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LSU Veterinary Hospital carries on after Hurricane Gustav

Many baby squirrels were brought to the SVM following Hurricane Gustav

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital remained open for emergency service following Hurricane Gustav. Since the storm struck the Louisiana coast, the SVM’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital has treated about 100 pets, not including a large number of baby squirrels and a number of baby birds treated by the SVM’s Wildlife Hospital. “We are seeing some pets with injuries from the storm, such as cuts from storm debris and other animal bites, among others,” said Steven Winkler, hospital director. “We are also seeing a number of animals from referral veterinarians because so many of those clinicians are not able to open their offices, or their phone lines are out and the clients are not able to reach their veterinarians. Of course, we are happy to be able to assist our local veterinarians at this time and return the animals to their local clinicians’ care as soon as their offices are open.”

Students, faculty, and staff worked in the hot and muggy Small Animal Treatment Room during Hurricane Gustav aftermath

The Veterinary Teaching Hospital lost power along with the rest of the University but was able to run on generator power (though without air conditioning). Winkler added, “The faculty, interns, residents, staff and students really stepped up to the task, even without air conditioning, and they did a fabulous job. We saw close to 100 baby squirrels brought into the hospital, and the students on duty greeted every one of them as if that squirrel was a personal pet of the person bringing that animal in to us. We will examine them and care for them until we can get them to wildlife rehabilitators, who will then release them back to the wild.”

“When we lost our air conditioning system, things got a little more exciting. The humidity in the building got so high that condensation built up on the floors and made the operating rooms virtually unusable,” said Winkler. As a result, the surgery staff moved to the School’s mobile unit with its self-contained A/C unit, and the surgery was done there. Portable A/C units were used to keep critical patients and equipment cool.

Students, clinicians, and staff were kept busy in the Small Animal Intensive Care Unit during the days following Hurricane Gustav

Winkler added, “Several members of our staff worked around-the-clock as they responded to the needs of our patients. Our facility services crew was always ready to do whatever was needed to keep us up and running, and members of our housekeeping staff did everything in their power to address the rain that blew into the building and the constantly-sweating floors.”

The LSU Large Animal Hospital received a few storm related cases, however, the equine industry as a whole was very proactive in carrying out evacuations and placing their animals out of harm’s way. The key concerns to be on the watch for now will be issues brought on by the increase of standing water; namely encephalitis cases caused by the increase in mosquito populations and hoof problems related to horses being in standing water for a prolonged period of time.

The Veterinary Teaching Hospital will open at 8:00 a.m. for regular business hours on Monday, September 8. The Hospital will continue to accept emergency patients on a 24-hour basis.

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Information for people evacuating with pets

Louisiana State University is closely monitoring Hurricane Gustav. Updates related to the storm will be posted at www.lsu.edu.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine will not be boarding any animals other than patients of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. People evacuating with their animals need to board their animals with a kennel or veterinarian in an area that will not be affected by the storm, or arrange to stay in a hotel that allows pets. People can ask their personal veterinarian for a referral to a veterinarian or boarding facility in an area that will not be affected by the storm. For on-line information about pet-friendly hotels, check out www.BringYourPet.com, www.petswelcome.com, or www.pets-allowed-hotels.com.

People can get information about planning for an evacuation with animals at the Louisiana State Animal Response Team (LSART) website at www.lsart.org. If people need assistance evacuating with pets, they should contact their local Office of Emergency Preparedness (http://www.ohsep.louisiana.gov/linkpages/parishpa.htm).

At this time, it is anticipated that the Veterinary Teaching Hospital will be operating under its regular hours on Thursday, August 28 and Friday, August 29. The Hospital will be open for emergencies only starting Friday, August 29 at 5:00 p.m. through Wednesday, September 3 at 8:00 a.m. These times are subject to change depending on the course of Hurricane Gustav. Further updates will be available on the School of Veterinary Medicine at www.vetmed.lsu.edu.

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LSU Equine Health Studies Program Has New Director

Dr. Andrews Frank

The Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine is pleased to announce that Frank Andrews, DVM, MS, DACVIM, is the new director of the LSU Equine Health Studies Program. He joined the faculty on August 1.

Dr. Andrews comes to LSU from the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine, where he was professor and section chief of large animal medicine. He earned his DVM and MS degrees from Washington State University and completed his residency at The Ohio State University. He has received many awards and honors and has served on numerous boards and in societies such as the Comparative Gastroenterology Society (past president), Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis (EPM) Society (current president), Medical Advisory Board to the Knoxville Zoological Park, and Equine Advisory Council with Astra-Zeneca, Merial, and Intervet, Inc. He has published over 100 refereed articles and book chapters and he has presented his research nationally and internationally.

On August 13, Dr. Andrews received the Webster Pendergrass Outstanding Service Award from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture. The award recognizes a teaching, research or extension faculty member who has contributed most to the fulfillment of the Institute’s goals and objectives. The nomination noted his lengthy service to equine research, his education of horse owners, practitioners and veterinary students and his leadership in the Institute of Agriculture. He contributed significant service to the College of Veterinary Medicine and the Institute of Agriculture during his 20 years at the University of Tennessee. The fact that his colleagues wanted to honor his service before he began a new phase of his career as director of equine health sciences at Louisiana State University is further recognition of his impact on the University.

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LSU Cardiology Service Implants Internal Defibrillator in a Dog

This is only the second time this has been done in the U.S.

General is a six-month-old male German Shepherd, who resides in Jackson, Mo., with his owners. Although apparently healthy, he was diagnosed with irregular heartbeats. General was started on anti-arrhythmic medications, but it is known that drugs mildly decrease the risk of sudden death at best. The treatment of choice was to implant an internal cardioverter defibrillator, or ICD.

General is prepared for his procedure in the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s anesthesia area.

Because of the difficulties associated with the implantation of a highly complex device designed for humans and the cost involved with such a procedure, there is only one pet with cardiac disease that has to this day received an internal defibrillator. With the support of an ICD manufacturer (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn.), General’s owners were able to obtain an ICD. They contacted the cardiology service at the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, which accepted the challenge of performing this rare procedure coordinated by Dr. Romain Pariaut, assistant professor of veterinary cardiology.

Implantable defibrillators are a life-saving therapy for many people with heart disease who are at risk for dangerously fast and potential lethal heart rates. An implantable defibrillator continuously monitors the heart and, if a dangerous or potentially lethal heart rate is detected, an electrical shock is sent to correct it.

General’s owners drove from Missouri to Baton Rouge on July 14. The procedure was done on July 16 with the support of the local ICD manufacturer’s field engineer. Unfortunately, this first surgery was unsuccessful because of the many differences between the dog and the human anatomy. On July 21, a second procedure was done successfully. The ICD was able to detect the episodes of rapid heart rate and treat them appropriately.

Dr. Romain Pariaut prepares the internal cardioveter defibrillator for placement in General.

General has been monitored for the past week in the intensive care unit. Because a new generation ICD was implanted, it is possible for the doctors to monitor the ICD wirelessly from a specifically designed computer, also called programmer. Also, it allows them to change multiple parameters as needed.

The procedure was successful, but there are many short term and long term complications, such as infection, that may happen after placement of an ICD. Dr. Pariaut will continue to monitor his progress. General’s owners are coming to the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine to take him home on SATURDAY, AUGUST 2. Members of the media are invited to meet them and General at the SVM. Please contact Ginger Guttner at 225-578-9922 or gguttner@vetmed.lsu.edu for more information.

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Dr. Peter F. Haynes

LSU Dean Receives National Veterinary Association’s Highest Honor

Dr. Peter F. Haynes, dean of the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine, has earned the 2008 AVMA Award. Marked as the American Veterinary Medical Association's highest honor, the award recognizes distinguished contributions to the advancement of veterinary medical organizations. The award was conferred at the AVMA’s Annual Conference held in New Orleans, La., July 19-22, 2008.

“It is a great honor to be recognized by our national organization and to join the outstanding veterinarians who previously received this prestigious award,” said Dr. Haynes. “I always saw my engagement in organized veterinary medicine as an opportunity to contribute to this great profession, and yet that involvement provided me with so much in the way of personal and professional development. My opportunity to be a volunteer leader was clearly facilitated by a supportive employer and colleagues over the years, career mentors and role models, and an understanding home environment. I am grateful to many individuals that contributed to my recognition by the AVMA.”

Dr. Haynes has been a member of the AVMA since 1969 and served for 17 years in the House of Delegates, representing the American Association of Equine Practitioners. He served on the House Advisory Committee for six years and was instrumental in the development of the first winter HOD session, held this past January. Additionally, he has served on numerous committees and task forces including the association’s Long Range Planning Committee.

Dr. Haynes is also a member of the American Association of Equine Practitioners and served as the association’s president in 1991. As part of that association, he helped guide its strategic planning initiative and governance changes and served on numerous other committees. In 2001, the AAEP honored him with Distinguished Life Membership. In addition, Dr. Haynes has participated on a variety of committees of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons. He also helped co-develop the Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association's Equine Committee.

Dr. Haynes earned his DVM degree from Colorado State University in 1969 and his American College of Veterinary Surgeons specialty certification in 1977. Along with his involvement in organized veterinary medicine, Dr. Haynes has held a variety of roles at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine since joining its staff as an equine clinician in 1974. He was executive associate dean from 2000 through 2006 and interim dean from July 2006 until June 2007, when he was named dean.

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LSU Hosts Veterinary Dermatology Conference

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is hosting a veterinary dermatology conference entitled, “A Look at Skin Disease Based on Clinical Lesions/Cutaneous Reaction Patterns in the Dog and Cat” on Sunday, September 7. This conference is generously sponsored by Vetoquinol USA Inc., Virbac Corporation, D.V. M. Pharmaceuticals (IVX Animal Health), Bayer Animal Health, and Sogeval.

Topics include Claw Disease of the Dog and Cat, The Pruritic Dog, Nasal Dermatoses of the Dog and Cat, Otitis Externa/Pinnal Disease of the Dog and Cat, Nodules and Draining Tracts in the Cat, Pododermatitis in the Dog and Cat, The Pruritic Cat, and Nodules and Draining Tracts in the Dog. The instructors are Kristen Fulham, DVM, MPT, dermatology resident, Southeast Veterinary Specialists; Stephen Lemarie, DVM, MS, DACVD, staff dermatologist, Southeast Veterinary Specialists; Sandra R. Merchant, DVM, DACVD, professor of veterinary dermatology and staff dermatologist, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine; Laura K. Sickafoose, DVM, dermatology resident, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine; Tara S. Snook DVM, assistant clinical professor of dermatology and staff dermatologist, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine; and Rebekah Westermeyer, DVM, MM, dermatology resident, LSU School of Veterinary Medicine.

Eight hours of continuing education credit or 0.8 CEU credits (one hour equals 0.1 CE unit) will be earned for this course. Certification forms will be provided for participants to certify the credit hours earned. The registration fee is $150 if postmarked on or before August 17 ($175 if postmarked after August 17). Fee includes seminar materials, break refreshments, and a catered lunch.

For more information, please call 225-578-9900, or click here to download a registration form.

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Summer Means Soaring Temperatures and Potential Heatstroke for Pets

Now that summer is here, it’s good to remember that some pets require special care to avoid heatstroke. Dogs cannot tell you when their temperatures rise, and it is our responsibility to ensure that our pets have sufficient shelter from the sun, adequate water to drink, and a way to cool off as the heat rises. Take care when leaving your pets outside during the day, and never leave your dog in a hot car, even for a few minutes.

A dog’s body temperature is normally between 101°F and 102°F. They regulate their body temperature by panting; dogs do not sweat like people. Panting expels the heat. If the heat is not expelled fast enough, the body temperature rises. A rise of 3 degrees to a temperature of 105°F can cause the dog to have problems keeping up with his body’s demand for oxygen. When the temperature hits 108°F, the internal organs can start breaking down at a cellular level.

Early signs of heatstroke are rapid breathing, dry nose, rapid heart rate, and gums that leave their healthy color for dull, grayish-pink or red. This is an emergency! If your dog exhibits these symptoms, move the dog to a shaded area, soak the coat in cool water, and get him to a veterinarian immediately. These symptoms can be followed in minutes by collapse, seizure, coma and death.

The most important aid in heatstroke is prevention, so please ensure that your outdoor pets have plenty of shade and water and avoid leaving your pets in the car, even with the windows down. Make sure that your pet has a tip-proof bowl, so that he can’t spill his water bowl while you’re not at home. Lastly, plan walks for the early morning or late evening hours when the temperature is relatively low. With a few minor precautions, you and your pets can have a safe and happy summer.

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LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital Again Receives Accreditation

Steven Winkler, director of the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital & Clinics, escorts Lisa Lopshire, AAHA practice consultant, through the hospital during the reaccreditation inspection. 

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital & Clinics has again received accreditation following a comprehensive evaluation by the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA). The evaluation includes a quality assessment review of the hospital’s facility, medical equipment, practice methods and pet health care management.

Only 12 percent of all small animal veterinary practices in the U.S. have achieved accreditation by the American Animal Hospital Association. In order to maintain accredited status, the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital must continue to be evaluated regularly by the association’s trained consultants.

“The LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital belongs to a select group of practices that are committed to meeting the highest standards in veterinary medicine,” says Thomas A. Carpenter, DVM, AAHA president. “AAHA hospitals pass a stringent evaluation of more than 900 standards covering patient care, client service and medical protocols. By attaining accreditation, the LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital is demonstrating its dedication to offering the best care to its patients and clients.”

The American Animal Hospital Association is an international organization of more than 36,000 veterinary care providers who treat companion animals. Established in 1933, the association is well known among veterinarians for its high standards for hospitals and pet health care. For pet care information or a referral to an AAHA hospital, pet owners can visit the AAHA website at www.healthypet.com.

The LSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital located at Skip Bertman Drive has been an accredited practice member of the association since 1976 and can be reached online at www.vetmed.lsu.edu.

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Confers Four Advanced Degrees

Receiving advanced degrees from the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine are (from left to right) Drs. Martin Vidal, David Sanchez-Migallon Guzman, and Sunil Chunilal Vasanjee. Congratulating them are (from right to left) Dean Peter F. Haynes, Associate Dean for Research and Advanced Studies Thomas R. Klei, and Professor of Veterinary Clinical Pathology Stephen Gaunt, representing the LSU Graduate School.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine conferred four graduate degrees at its Diploma Distribution Ceremony for the Graduate Academic Studies Program on May 16.

Associate Dean for Research and Advanced Studies and Boyd Professor Thomas R. Klei, Ph.D. presided over the ceremony, and Dr. Peter F. Haynes, dean of the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine, greeted the guests. Dr. Stephen D. Gaunt, professor of veterinary clinical pathology, served as the representative of the LSU Graduate Council and conferred the degrees.

Anna Henrik Israyelyan (Yerevan, Armenia) received her Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree from the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. Her dissertation is entitled, “Novel Oncolytic Herpesviruses for Breast Cancer Treatment.” Dr. Israyelyan’s major advisor was Dr. Konstantin G. Kousoulas, professor of veterinary virology.

Martin Andreas Vidal (Munich, Germany) received his Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree from the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. His dissertation is entitled, “Characterization and Comparison of Cell Frequency, Growth, and Multipotential Differentiation of Adult Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Derived from Equine Bone Marrow and Adipose Tissue.” Dr. Vidal’s major advisors were Dr. Jill R. Johnson, professor of veterinary medicine, and Dr. Rustin M. Moore, adjunct professor of veterinary surgery.

David S. Migallon (Almagro, Spain) received his Master’s (M.S.) degree from the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. His dissertation is entitled, “Randomized Controlled Trial Evaluating Adeno-MOMP and MOMP DNA Vaccines Against Chlamydophila psittaci Challenge in Cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus).” Migallon’s major advisor was Dr. Thomas N. Tully, Jr., professor of veterinary clinical sciences.

Sunil Chunilal Vasanjee (Bulawayo, Zimbabwe) received his Master’s (M.S.) degree from the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences. His dissertation is entitled, “Phenotypic Characterization of Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Associated Synoviocytes.” Dr. Vasanjee’s major advisors were Dr. Mandi Lopez, assistant professor, and Dr. Giselle Hosgood, professor of veterinary surgery.

“Training future biomedical researchers is an extremely important part of the mission of the School of Veterinary Medicine,” said Dr. Klei. “Our students continue to be successful following graduation and take significant positions in biomedical research in academia, industry and the private sector. The diversity of research activities within the SVM is also reflected in the titles of their theses and dissertations. The School is one of the premier biomedical research institutions in the state and would not be so without the graduate program.”

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Presents Scholarships and Awards at Annual Banquet

On May 2, the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine hosted the 34th annual Awards and Honors Banquet at the LSU Union. The banquet was sponsored in part by Nestlé Purina Pet Care, Novartis Animal Health, and the Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association (LVMA).

Dr. Joseph Taboada, associate dean for Student and Academic Affairs, served as Master of Ceremonies. Each year, the Master of Ceremonies is the winner of the Carl J. Norden Distinguished Teacher Award from the previous year. Dean Peter F. Haynes welcomed the guests.

The evening’s awards were capped off with the presentation of the Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation and LVMA Outstanding Student Awards. The AVMF granted the Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Senior Awards to two top graduating veterinary students from Arkansas. The awards are based on academic performance and leadership potential. This year’s recipients are Jana Doege and Rachel Warner. The LVMA bestowed awards to three students on the basis of scholastic achievement, demonstrated leadership ability, and professional attitude and acumen. This year’s recipients are Julie Schexnider (Class of 2008), Marc Bordelon (Class of 2009), and Holly Brown (Class of 2010).

Over $130,000 was distributed to students in the form of awards and scholarships. Faculty and staff awards were bestowed at the beginning of the evening. The award recipients are listed below alphabetically in order of their hometown state and city:

Arkansas

Dr. David Senior, associate dean for advancement and strategic initiatives, congratulates Jana Doege (Class of 2008) upon her receipt of the Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Senior Award. Not pictured is the other award recipient Rachel Warner (Class of 2008).

Nanci Solis, Class of 2011, Batesville, Ark., Opal Christiansen Memorial Scholarship;

Stacey Smith, Class of 2010, Batesville, Ark., Opal Christiansen Memorial Scholarship;

Bradley Self, Class of 2009, Blytheville, Ark., Perry B. LeCates, Sr. Memorial Scholarship;

Melinda Larson, Class of 2010, Cabot, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship;

Joshua Hobbs, Class of 2010, Cave Springs, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship;

Chad Brown, Class of 2011, Conway, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Scholarship and Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship;

Crystal Garner, Class of 2009, Danville, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship;

Elizabeth Pike, Class of 2009, DeQueen, Ark., LSU SCAVMA Bookstore Scholarship and Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association/American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation Scholarship;

Marlow Ball, Class of 2010, Fayetteville, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship;

Julie Pate, Class of 2011, Little Rock, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship;

Kevin Ware, Class of 2010, Little Rock, Ark., Opal Christiansen Memorial Scholarship;

Drew Parker, Class of 2009, Lonoke, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship;

Chris Nelson, Class of 2011, Malvern, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Scholarship and Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Scholarship;

Becky Neis, Class of 2011, Mountain Home, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Scholarship;

Cassidee Landry, Class of 2009, Rogers, Ark., Opal Christiansen Memorial Scholarship;

Sheri Andrews, Class of 2009, Sherwood, Ark., Opal Christiansen Memorial Scholarship; and

Crystal Goche Myers, Class of 2009, West Memphis, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Scholarship.

California

Ambria Haddad, Class of 2011, Chino Hills, Calif., Student Chapter of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society Award.

Connecticut

Stefania Naiman, Class of 2009, Danbury, Conn., LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Aesculapian Scholarship.

Florida

Michelle Dunleavy, Class of 2010, Amelia Island, Fla., Brenda and William Banks Memorial Award;

Rachel Carlson, Class of 2010, Bradenton, Fla., AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship;

Melissa Irene Smith, Class of 2011, Jacksonville, Fla., Dr. Herbert C. Berger Scholarship; and

Robert Blair, Class of 2010, Miami, Fla., Changaram Kumarath Sankunny Memorial Award in Veterinary Pharmacology.

Georgia

Jennifer Caldwell, Class of 2011, Gainesville, Ga., Sheri Ellen Cole Memorial Scholarship.

Idaho

Katherine Smith, Class of 2009, Boise, Idaho, Salsbury Scholarship.

Illinois

Alison Salmon, Class of 2011, Carlyle, Ill., Veterinary Business Management Association Award.

Louisiana

Dr. James Rundell (left), president of the Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association, bestows the LVMA Outstanding Student Awards on (from left to right) Julie Schexnider (Class of 2008), Holly Brown (Class of 2010), and Marc Bordelon (Class of 2009).

Daniel Langois, Class of 2009, Baton Rouge, La., Salsbury Scholarship;

Gregg Griffenhagen, Class of 2009, Baton Rouge, La., Student Chapter of the American Association of Feline Practitioners Award and Catherine M. Landry and Daniel Gillane Feline Studies Scholarship;

Hilari French, Class of 2009, Baton Rouge, La., The Robert M. Hammatt Award for Proficiency in Food Animal Medicine;

Kristine Hawkins, Class of 2009, Baton Rouge, La., Auxiliary to the LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Married Student Award

Michael Ratcliff, Class of 2009, Baton Rouge, La., Western Veterinary Conference Scholarship and John D. Rhoades Leadership Scholarship;

Rosey Andermann, Class of 2009, Baton Rouge, La., LSU SCAVMA Bookstore Scholarship;

April Downs Fitzgerald, Class of 2009, Baton Rouge/Alexandria, La., Lorio Children Memorial Scholarship and Salsbury Scholarship;

Leia Feinberg, Class of 2010, Bogalusa, La., Peri Tümay, DVM, Memorial Fellowship;

Emilie Schlatre McLellan, Class of 2009, Central, La., Open House Award of Appreciation;

Tina Miletello, Class of 2010, Central, La., Schering Plough Animal Health, Inc. Scholarship and Harold G. Forman Family Foundation Equine Scholarship;

Kelli Urbina, Class of 2011, Covington, La., Baton Rouge Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Scholarship;

Laura D'Amico, Class of 2009, Crowley, La., Auxiliary to the LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association NAVLE Award and Dr. Robert K. Morris Scholarship;

André Joubert, Class of 2010, Eunice, La., LSU SCAVMA Bookstore Scholarship;

Heather Bryant, Class of 2011, Hineston, La., King-Solberger Scholarship;

Kristin Marchal, Class of 2010, Kenner, La., AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship;

Marc Bordelon, Class of 2009, Lafayette, La., Auxiliary to the LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Scholarship, Auxiliary to the LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association NAVLE Award, Simmons and Associates Award, and Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association Outstanding Student Award;

Kimber Singer, Class of 2011, Lake Charles, La., Calcasieu Kennel Club Scholarship;

Brandy Stone, Class of 2009, Leesville, La., Raptor and Wildlife Rehabilitation Achievement Award;

Ashley Leggitt, Class of 2010, Mandeville, La., LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Aesculapian Scholarship and Eagle’s Talon Award of Appreciation;

Leslie Pence, Class of 2009, Mandeville, La., Raptor and Wildlife Rehabilitation Achievement Award;

Amanda Claudet, Class of 2009, Marrero, La., Baton Rouge Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Scholarship;

Courtney Claire Brooks, Class of 2011, Metairie, La., Y.Z. Abdelbaki Memorial Scholarship;

Cynthia Rachal, Class of 2009, Metairie, La., American Society of Laboratory Animal Practitioners Student Award;

Mary Leissenger, Class of 2010, Metairie, La., Invisible Fence Scholarship;

Jeremy Delcambre, Class of 2009, Monroe, La., Bayou Kennel Club, Inc. Scholarship;

Lucy Newsome, Class of 2010, Monroe, La., Perry B. LeCates, Sr. Memorial Scholarship;

Patrick Cutbirth, Class of 2011, Monroe, La., Bayou Kennel Club, Inc. Scholarship and LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Aesculapian Scholarship;

Aliya "Yani" Magee, Class of 2009, New Orleans, La., Herman W. and Estelle Z. Kutun Scholarship;

Cynthia Albert, Class of 2009, New Orleans, La., AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship and Open House Award of Appreciation;

Jennifer Bruno, Class of 2010, New Orleans, La., LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Aesculapian Scholarship;

Kevin Showalter, Class of 2009, New Orleans, La., Auxiliary to the LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Married Student Award;

Lisa Ciolino, Class of 2010, New Orleans, La., The Doctor Michael G. Groves Award;

Meredith Mouney, Class of 2009, New Orleans, La., Salsbury Scholarship;

Mitzi Clark, Class of 2009, New Orleans, La., Dr. Kim Michels Memorial Scholarship and North American Veterinary Conference Scholarship;

Adrienne Dardenne, Class of 2010, New Roads, La., Schering Plough Animal Health, Inc. Scholarship;

Alyce Leger, Class of 2009, Opelousas, La., Salsbury Scholarship;

Daniel Dorbandt, Class of 2011, Shreveport, La., Lorio Children Memorial Scholarship;

David Espinosa, Class of 2009, Sulphur, La., AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship;

Devon Castleberry Owens, Class of 2009, Sulphur, La., Raptor and Wildlife Rehabilitation Achievement Award;

Morgan Daigle, Class of 2011, Sulphur, La., LSU Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association Aesculapian Scholarship;

Amber Michelle Ferguson, Class of 2011, West Monroe, La., Y.Z. Abdelbaki Memorial Scholarship; and

Jessica Simmons Parker, Class of 2009, West Monroe, La., Harold G. Forman Family Foundation Equine Scholarship and Race for Education Winner's Circle Scholarship.

Massachusetts

Marie Chartier, Class of 2009, Templeton, Mass., Hill's Pet Nutrition Service Scholarship.

Michigan

Carrie Washburn , Class of 2009, Fraser, Mich., Sheri Ellen Cole Memorial Scholarship.

North Carolina

Meghan Johnson, Class of 2009, Lenoir, N.C., The Henry Chester Propes and Mary Wood Propes Memorial Scholarship; and

Grace Burns, Class of 2011, Washington, N.C., Perry B. LeCates, Sr. Memorial Scholarship.

New Hampshire

Holly Brown, Class of 2010, Berlin, N.H., Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association Outstanding Student Award; and

Michelle Ruth Fecteau, Class of 2009, Laconia, N.H., Nestlé Purina Award for Excellence in Companion Animal Nutrition.

New York

Patricia Schuster, Class of 2009, Glenville, N.Y., Louisiana Academy of Veterinary Practice Companion Animal Scholarship and Salsbury Scholarship;

Jessica Lipsett, Class of 2011, Liverpool, N.Y., LSU SCAVMA Bookstore Scholarship;

Leigh Parisi, Class of 2009, Plainview, N.Y., Association of Avian Veterinarians Award; and

Verna Serra, Class of 2009, Suffern, N.Y., Margaret Lucille Thomas Taylor Memorial Scholarship and Salsbury Scholarship.

Pennsylvania

Brendon Brophy, Class of 2010, Mt. Holly Springs, Pa., AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship.

Puerto Rico

Astrid Bigio, Class of 2009, San Juan, Puerto Rico, M. Darnell Besch Scholarship.

Texas

Lisa Berkowitz, Class of 2009, Kingwood, Texas, Pfizer Animal Health Veterinary Scholarship Award; and

Janel Doud, Class of 2011, Southlake, Texas, AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship.

West Virginia

Holly A. Rice, Class of 2009, Ridgeley, W.V., AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship.

Zimbabwe, Africa

Amy Norvall, Class of 2011, Harare, Zimbabwe, AVID/Novartis Chip Day Scholarship and LSU SVM Equine Health Studies Program Scholarship.

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LSU Veterinary School Offers Limited Equine Dentistry Course for Non-Veterinarians

The 2008 edition of the Limited Equine Dentistry Short Course will be held June 18-21, 2008, at the School of Veterinary Medicine at Louisiana State University. This course is designed to fulfill the requirements of the Louisiana State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners for the practices of limited equine dentistry by the non-veterinarian. The course will include a review of equine dental anatomy, aging, common dental abnormalities in horses, dental equipment and floating techniques and approximately 10 hours of actual floating on live horses.

June 18 will consist of four hours of continuing education for individuals that have completed the course in the past. June 19-21 are the dates of the full course including one-half day on Saturday.

Lectures will be provided by the faculty of the School of Veterinary Medicine and laboratory teaching will be carried out by faculty and Mr. Frank Albert of Albert's Equine Dental Supply, who will also be providing all of the necessary hand equipment for the course. At the conclusion of the course, participants will be required to complete an unassisted dental examination and a routine dental float on a horse and take and pass a written examination in order to receive a certificate of completion and have their names submitted to the state board to legally practice limited equine dentistry in the state of Louisiana.

The cost of the one-day continuing education course is $300. The cost of the full two-and-a-half-day course is $800. This will include all lectures and laboratories, the use of hand tools, live horses and lunch on Thursday and Friday. The full course will be limited to eight participants.

Registration deadline is June 13, 2008. Any questions should be directed to Dr. Charles McCauley at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine at 225-578-9500. To attend, please fill out a registration form (download form at http://www.equine.vetmed.lsu.edu/dentistryreg.pdf) and include a check for the registration fees and send to:

LSU School of Veterinary Medicine
Equine Health Studies Program
Attention Dr. Charles McCauley
Dept. VCS
Baton Rouge, La 70803


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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Confers Degrees and Awards

The Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine conferred 83 Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degrees at its 32nd annual Veterinary Medicine Commencement Exercises on Monday, May 12.  President Emeritus and Acting Chancellor William Jenkins, a former dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, gave the commencement address at the 2 p.m. ceremony.

 

Dr. Jenkins presided over the ceremony, and Mr. Jerry Shea, chairman of the LSU Board of Supervisors conferred the degrees.  Dr. Jessica Enes, Class of 2008, opened the ceremony with the invocation.  Program speakers included Clifford Vannoy, senior vice president of the LSU Alumni Association, Dr. Pamela Mitchell, School of Veterinary Medicine Alumni Association president, and Dr. James Rundell, president of the Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association.

 

Dr. Peter F. Haynes, dean, led the graduates in taking the Veterinarian’s Oath, adopted by the American Veterinary Medical Association in 1969.  Dr. Wesley Louis Lee, Class of 2008, closed the ceremony with the benediction.

 

Students who received Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degrees, senior awards, and internships are listed below alphabetically by state and hometown:

 

Arkansas

Shawn Marie Zimmerman, Clinton, Ark.;

Jana Katherine Doege, Fayetteville, Ark., Lady Baldridge Companion Animal Award and the  Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Senior Award;

Jennifer Michelle Mosley, Fort Smith, Ark., Open House Award of Appreciation;

Aaron Joshua Wages, Hampton, Ark.;

Katie Marie Baeyens, Little Rock, Ark.;

Lauren Elizabeth Long, Little Rock, Ark.

Heather Lyn Caldwell, Monticello, Ark.;

Alice Lynn Holifield, Rector, Ark.; and

Rachel Melanie Warner, Witts Springs, Ark., Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Senior Award.

 

Connecticut

Katrine L. Voie, Westport, Conn., Schering Plough/Welch Allyn Small Animal Medicine Award.

 

Florida

Shelonda Lind Horton, Panama City Beach, Fla.;

Jennifer Lynn Fenner, Zephyrhills, Fla.

 

Illinois

Rimme Serena Singh, Northbrook, Ill., Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery Certificate of Merit Award.

 

Louisiana

Laura Catherine Ward, Abita Springs, La.;

Bridget Cheree Kelly, Baker, La.;

Andrea Mae Andersen, Baton Rouge, La.;

Amy Beem Chow, Baton Rouge, La.;

Wendy Oubre Day, Baton Rouge, La.;

Anthony Michael Ioppolo, Baton Rouge, La.;

Travis Lee Procell, Baton Rouge, La.;

Evan Andrew Sones, Baton Rouge, La., Pfizer Small Animal Clinical Proficiency Award,

American College of Veterinary Radiology Award, and Schering Plough Oncology Award;

Jenny Liford Sones, Baton Rouge, La., LVMA Equine Clinical Proficiency Award;

Megan Gloria Stone, Baton Rouge, La., Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery Certificate of Merit Award;

Brian Thomas Vandegrift, Baton Rouge, La.;

Jeri Beth Kindon, Blanchard, La.;

Ashley Kenner Turner, Bossier City, La.;

Jamie Sanders Ducote, Bunkie, La.;

Lauren Kaye Esposito, Chalmette, La., Merial Shelter Medicine Award;

Katie Chris Foote, Covington, La.;

Emily Claire Hensgens, Crowley, La.;

Leslie Ann Andermann, Gonzales, La.;

Kaikhushroo Hormazd Banajee, Kenner, La., Allan H. Hart/IDEXX Award;

Casi Elizabeth Boudreaux, Lafayette, La.;

Lindsey Renee Boudreaux, Lafayette, La.;

Heidi Elisabeth Cobb, Lafayette, La.;

Rebecca Lynn Poillion, Lafayette, La.;

Julie Montgomery Schexnider, Lafayette, La., Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association Outstanding Student Award;

Paul Anthony Whittington, Lafayette, La.;

Lindsey Nicole Myers, Lake Charles, La.;

Sarah Crenshaw Pitre, Larose, La.;

Jessica Carey Duncan, Mandeville, La., Arizona Equine Medical & Surgical Centre Award;

Lara MacDonald, Mandeville, La.;

Jennifer Lee Nitsche, Mandeville, La., Bayer Client Communications Award;

Gabriel Aran Van Brunt, Mandeville, La., American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists Award;

Jennifer Marie Sandoz, Marrero, La., Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery Certificate of Merit Award and Bayer Award for Excellence in Dermatology;

Patricia Terrell Richardel, Metairie, La.;

Derek Ryan Kopecky, Mire, La., Schering Plough Cardiology Award;

Carly Casteel Billeaudeau, Monroe, La.;

Claudia Rachel Channing, New Orleans, La., Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society Award and Pfizer Anesthesiology Award;

Jessica Ann Leto, New Orleans, La.;

Connie Lynn McMillan, New Orleans, La.;

Diane Mary Savois, New Orleans, La.;

Margaret Neighbors Trumble, New Orleans, La., Kaytee Outstanding Senior Award in Avian and Exotic Animal Medicine;

Bronk B. McDaniel, Plainview, La., The Hershey Comeaux Memorial Award of Excellence and Novartis/Ethicon Companion Animal Award;

Amy Elizabeth Munchausen, Ponchatoula, La.;

Wesley Louis Lee, Shreveport, La., Edward Lloyd Mitchell Memorial Award, Hills "Buddy" Award, Louisiana Cattlemen’s Association/Beef Industry Council Clinical Proficiency Award, and American College of Veterinary Surgeons Proficiency Award;

April Storey Mackey, Shreveport, La.;

Glen A. Bonin, Jr., Slidell, La., American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists Award and American College of Veterinary Surgeons Proficiency Award;

Layne Rebecca Holland-Younger, Slidell, La.;

Emilie Seal Rouse, Varnado, La.;

Jason Christopher Brewer, Ville Platte, La.;

Jamie Lynn Charlie, Ville Platte, La.; and

Veronica Villars Abadie, Westwego, La.

 

Massachusetts

Jennifer A. Ayoub, Shrewsbury, Mass., Pfizer Critical Care Award.

 

Maryland

Lauren Kathryn Popiolek, Bel Air, Md.; and

James Robert Schinner, Jr., Ijamsville, Md.

 

Michigan

Mindy Anne Cooper, Cadillac, Mich., Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery Certificate of Merit Award; and

Elizabeth Jean Mann, Fenton, Mich.

 

New Jersey

Elizabeth Ruth Merz, Maywood, N.J., American Association of Feline Practitioners Proficiency Award.

 

New York

Diana M. Lalor, Cambridge, N.Y.;

Stacy Heather Sultan, Kings Park, N.Y.;

Jessica Erin Enes, Rochester, N.Y., AVMA Auxiliary Fourth-Year Student Award and Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery Certificate of Merit Award;

Maghan Eveland Wormuth, Rochester, N.Y.; and

Tracy Jean Millhouse, Rome, N.Y.

 

Pennsylvania

Amy Sara Holland, Southampton, Pa., Open House Award of Appreciation; and

Courtney Lin Miani, West Chester, Pa.

 

Puerto Rico

Alexander Mesonero-Morales, Aguada, Puerto Rico;

Karelma Frontera Acevedo, San Juan, Puerto Rico;

Javier J. Silva, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Companion Animal Medicine and Surgery Certificate of Merit Award; and

Jennifer Crescioni-Laborde, Trujillo Alto, Puerto Rico, American Animal Hospital Association Senior Student Award and DermaPet Award for Excellence in Dermatology.

 

Texas

Erin Elizabeth Roof, Flower Mound, Texas, Pfizer Internal Medicine Award;

Antonio Leonardi-Cattolica, Houston, Texas; and

Virginia Chantil Einck, New Waverly, Texas.

 

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Hosts Annual Awards & Honors Banquet

Dean Peter F. Haynes (center) congratulates Dr. Kirk Ryan (left) and Dr. Mark Acierno, the recipients of the 2008 School of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Awards. Not pictured is award recipient Dr. C.S. Venugopal.

On May 2, the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine hosted the 34th annual Awards and Honors Banquet at the LSU Union. The banquet was sponsored in part by Nestlé Purina Pet Care, Novartis Animal Health, and the Louisiana Veterinary Medical Association (LVMA).

Dr. Joseph Taboada, associate dean for Student and Academic Affairs, served as Master of Ceremonies. Each year, the Master of Ceremonies is the winner of the Carl J. Norden Distinguished Teacher Award from the previous year. Dean Peter F. Haynes welcomed the guests.

Over $130,000 was distributed to students in the form of awards and scholarships. Faculty and staff awards were bestowed at the beginning of the evening.

 

The Pfizer Animal Health Award for Research Excellence was presented to Dr. Fang-Ting Liang, assistant professor in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences. This award is given to a faculty member who has excelled in veterinary medical research during the past two years.

Dr. James Miller, professor of epidemiology and community health in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences, received the School of Veterinary Medicine Distinguished Scholar Award, which is bestowed to a faculty member who has made significant contributions to the advancement of veterinary medicine through research and/or scholarly activity.

The School of Veterinary Medicine Faculty Service Award was presented to Dr. David F. Senior, associate

dean for advancement and strategic initiatives. This award is presented to a faculty member who, in the opinion of his or her fellow faculty, has made significant contributions to the service aspects of the School of Veterinary Medicine.

The School of Veterinary Medicine Teaching Award is presented to the faculty member nominated by each class for the Carl J. Norden Distinguished Teacher Award. The class of 2011 nominated Dr. C.S. Venugopal, professor of veterinary physiology, pharmacology and toxicology in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences; the Class of 2010 nominated Dr. Mark Acierno, assistant professor of companion animal medicine in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences; and the Classes of 2008 and 2009 nominated Dr. Kirk Ryan, assistant professor of veterinary medicine in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences.

The Carl J. Norden Distinguished Teacher Award was presented to Dr. Kirk Ryan. This award is bestowed to a faculty member to recognize outstanding teaching as judged by the responsiveness of his or her students.

The evening’s awards were capped off with the presentation of the Arkansas Veterinary Medical Foundation and LVMA Outstanding Student Awards. The AVMF granted the Jack R. Redman and Elizabeth G. Redman Senior Awards to two top graduating veterinary students from Arkansas. The awards are based on academic performance and leadership potential. This year’s recipients are Jana Doege and Rachel Warner. The LVMA bestowed awards to three students on the basis of scholastic achievement, demonstrated leadership ability, and professional attitude and acumen. This year’s recipients are Julie Schexnider (Class of 2008), Marc Bordelon (Class of 2009), and Holly Brown (Class of 2010).

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Seventeen Students to Participate in Veterinary Summer Scholars Program

Seventeen students have been selected to participate in the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Summer Scholars Program, an introduction to biomedical research through research-driven activities. The 2008 Summer Scholars Program is funded by the Merck-Merial Veterinary Scholar Program, a grant from the National Institutes of Health, and a fellowship from the Comparative Gastroenterology Society.

The Summer Scholars Program serves to further students’ learning and experiences beyond the required classroom and clinical training. The program is competitive and based on proposals submitted by first- and second-year veterinary students. The program encourages innovative studies in human and animal diseases, and lends further understanding to veterinary careers in biomedical research. Each year Merck-Merial selects veterinary schools to participate in its Animal Health Grants program, and LSU has received the funding for the seventh consecutive year. For the fifth consecutive year, students will also receive grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH) for summer study. There are only eight veterinary schools in the country with summer grant programs funded by both Merck-Merial and the NIH. The school also received a fellowship from the Comparative Gastroenterology Society. This society only funds one student per year, and it is notable that a student in the SVM received this award for the second consecutive year.

The grants provide $5,000 stipends to each student. Merck-Merial will also sponsor the students’ participation at the 2008 Merck-Merial Symposium on July 31-August 3, 2008, at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., where research will be presented by students from the participating veterinary schools. This conference will bring together scientists from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and NIH leadership in one setting.

To participate in the Summer Scholars program, the students developed their own research plan proposals with the guidance of a faculty member, and a faculty committee selected the participants based on the proposals. All first and second year veterinary students throughout the country and abroad had the opportunity to submit proposals.

The recipients of the Merck-Merial Summer Research Awards and their project titles are as follows:

Nicholas Angelette is a member of the Class of 2010 from Metairie, La., and his project is entitled, “Contrast harmonic and spectral Doppler ultrasound imaging of visceral lymph nodes in dogs.” His faculty mentor is Dr. Lorrie Gaschen, associate professor of veterinary radiology.

Amanda “Brendt” Bonura is a member of the Class of 2011 from Sunset, La., and her project is entitled, “Estrus suppression in the mare: Avoiding the need for frequent administration to effectively inhibit estrous behavior.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Dale Paccamonti, head of the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences and professor of theriogenology.

Daniel Dorbandt is a member of the Class of 2011 from Shreveport, La., and his project is entitled, “Characterization of integrins in the normal canine cornea.” His faculty mentors are Dr. Renee Carter, assistant professor of veterinary ophthalmology, and Dr. Timothy Morgan, assistant professor of veterinary clinical medicine.

Meghan Hayden is a member of the Class of 2011 at Auburn University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, and her project is entitled, “A pharmacokinetic study looking at levamisole administration in horses and cows.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Rebecca McConnico, associate professor of veterinary medicine.

Diana Seaton is a member of the Class of 2010 from Long Beach, Miss., and her project is entitled, “Role of acute phase proteins in feline chronic kidney disease.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Mark Acierno, assistant professor of companion animal medicine.

Margaret Shoats is a member of the Class of 2011 from Clinton, La., and her project is entitled, “The postnatal development of the coffin bone and its vascular system in the equine hoof.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Hermann Bragulla, assistant professor of comparative biomedical sciences.

Nanci Solis is a member of the Class of 2011 from Batesville, Ark., and her project is entitled, “Evaluation of pelleted sericea lespedeza supplementation following an initial deworming bolus of copper oxide wire particles for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in kids and lambs. Her faculty mentor is Dr. James Miller, professor of epidemiology and community health.

Kevin Ware is a member of the Class of 2010 from Little Rock, Ark., and his project is entitled, “Examination of pathogenesis of Francisella sp. (warm water fish strain) in tilapia and tilapia head kidney macrophages in vitro and in vivo.” His faculty mentor is Dr. John Hawke, associate professor of veterinary microbiology and parasitology.

The recipients of the NIH Biomedical Research Experience for Veterinary Students Awards and their project titles are as follows:

Diana Babin is a member of the Class of 2010 from Gonzales, La., and her project is entitled, “Determination of caprine humoral antibody response against cholera toxin B expressed in a transgenic plan vaccine.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Philip Elzer, professor of veterinary science and professor of microbiology and parasitology.

Robert Blair is a member of the Class of 2010 from Miami, Fla., and his project is entitled, “The therapeutic effect and safety of 1-methyl-D, L-tryptohan, in combination with IL12 gene therapy, for treatment of tumors in mice.” His faculty mentor is Dr. Shulin Li, professor in the Department of Comparative Biomedical Sciences.

Julia Coutin is a member of the Class of 2010 from New Orleans, La., and her project is entitled, “The topical effect of Carprofen on the function of canine hepatic mitochondria.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Giselle Hosgood, professor of veterinary surgery.

Ann Craig is a member of the Class of 2011 from Andover, N.H., and her project is entitled, “Development of novel cell culture system to obtain monkey neutrophils from bone marrow cells.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Samithamby Jeyaseelan, assistant professor in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences.

Natalie Wall Fowlkes is a member of the Class of 2010 from West Monroe, La., and her project is entitled, “Examining the expression of CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 in leprosy type 1 reactions via immunohistochemical staining.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. David M. Scollard, adjunct professor of veterinary pathology.

Kim Gusman is a member of the Class of 2010 from Anaheim, Calif., and her project is entitled, “The association of muscular atrophy and neuropathy due to leprosy in the armadillo.” Her faculty advisor is Dr. Richard Truman, adjunct professor of epidemiology and community health.

Alison Rodden Salmon is a member of the Class of 2011 from Carlyle, Ill., and her project is entitled, “The role of CD36 receptors on Circumvallate papillae of Osborne-Mendel rats in increasing preference for and intake of high fat diets.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. H. Douglas Braymer, professor at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center.

Diana Tran is a member of the Class of 2011 from Houma, La., and her project is entitled, “Aged dendritic cells in primates demonstrate a decreased ability to present encephalitozoon cuniculi and the effect of IL-15 administration on CTL response.” Her faculty mentor is Dr. Hollie Hale Donze, assistant professor in the LSU Biological Sciences Department.

The recipient of the Comparative Gastroenterology Society fellowship is:

Josh Hobbs is a member of the Class of 2010 from Cave Springs, Ark., and his project is entitled, “Doppler analysis of gastrointestinal blood flow in dogs: Investigations in food allergic patients and role of glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) in postprandial splanchnic vasodilation.” His faculty mentors are Drs. Frederic Gaschen, associate professor of companion animal medicine, and Lorrie Gaschen, associate professor of veterinary radiology.

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Hosts Pets & Vets

Visitors learn about the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s equine treadmill and horse anatomy as part of the annual Pets & Vets summer program.

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is hosting Pets & Vets, its annual children’s educational program, beginning June 3 and ending June 26. Pets & Vets features various topics regarding veterinary medicine and basic information about pet and animal care. All presentations are free and open to the public, but pre-registration is requested. The program is open to all children ages 6 and up, unless otherwise noted on the schedule. Parents are also invited to attend the presentations with their children. The 2008 Pets & Vets schedule is as follows: 

Tuesday, June 3, 2008

10:00 a.m.    Bird Brains: Dummy or Einstein
11:00 a.m.    Choosing and Caring for Your Pet

Thursday, June 10, 2008

10:00 a.m.    Learning to Walk Again: Physical Rehab for Pets
11:00 a.m.    Tour of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital

Tuesday, June 12, 2008

10:00 a.m.    How Farm Animals Help People
11:00 a.m.    The Wonderful World of Cows

Thursday, June 17, 2008

10:00 a.m.    Careers in Veterinary Medicine (ages 9 and up)
11:00 a.m.    Alligators, Louisiana’s State Reptile

Tuesday, June 19, 2008

10:00 a.m.    Raptors
11:00 a.m.    Dogs Have a Lot of Guts

Thursday, June 24, 2008

10:00 a.m.    A Day in the Life of an Equine Technician
11:00 a.m.    My What Big (Horse) Teeth You Have

 Tuesday, June 26, 2008

10:00 a.m.    Anatomy and Locomotion of the Horse
11:00 a.m.    How Pets Help Us

All Pets & Vets courses are held at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine on Skip Bertman Drive. For more information, or to register a child, contact the School at (225) 578-9900.

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Presents Five Staff Awards

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine presented awards to five staff members at a spring reception on May 1.

Dean Peter F. Haynes congratulates the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine’s 2008 Staff Award recipients shown from left to right:  Leslie Talley (Administrative Support Award), Lisa Roundtree (Outstanding Achievement Award), Jackie Murray (Academic Support Award), Kendra Shultz (Technical Management Award), and Cecelia “C.K.” Koon (Operations Management Award).

Lisa Roundtree, lab animal assistant technician (dermatology) in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital and Clinics, was presented with the Outstanding Achievement Award, which recognizes an employee from all SVM staff categories, who exhibits superior work habits and who gives extra contributions to the School. Roundtree was commended for her 17 years of service to the LSU SVM and her dependability, communication skills, willingness to help others, and perseverance.

The Administrative Support Award was presented to Leslie Talley, associate clinical specialist (equine) in the VTH&C. This award recognizes an employee for excellence in support in all areas of administration. Talley was commended for her 20 years of service to the LSU SVM and her dedication, loyalty, initiative, and efficiency.

Jackie Murray, an administrative coordinator in the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, won the Academic Support Award for excellence in providing academic support to the School’s faculty. Murray was commended for her 25 years of service and her dependability and attention to detail, as well as her computer and communication skills.

The Operations Management Award was presented to Ceclia “C.K.” Koon, lab animal technician in the Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine. The award recognizes outstanding management support in all areas of the School’s operations. Koon was commended for her 18 years of service and her ability to supervise others, positive attitude, and leadership abilities.

Kendra Shultz, a research associate in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences, received the Technical Management Award for her outstanding technical service to the School. Shultz was commended for her seven years of service and her dependability, enthusiasm, and resourcefulness.

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LSU Veterinary School Acquires Mobile Emergency Response Unit with Help from the American Kennel Club

The LSU SVM's new Mobile Emergency Response Unit

In June 2006, the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery (AKC CAR) established the American Kennel Club Companion Animal Recovery Emergency Response Unit Fund. In response to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine (LSU SVM) partnered with the AKC CAR to develop a mobile response unit that can be used to respond to any natural disaster in which small animals are left injured or abandoned. The AKC CAR is providing partial funding for the purchase and equipping of a mobile unit. The LSU SVM is providing a vehicle to pull the unit, staffing for the unit, and necessary supplies.

This unit will be used for emergency response and will serve as an active component of an integrated system for responding to natural disasters. This unit will also significantly enhance the ability of the LSU SVM to provide immediate care to injured, dehydrated, or otherwise debilitated animals.

During the interim, when the mobile unit is not being used for disasters, it will be used as part of the Southeast Louisiana Spay/Neuter/Animal and Community Wellness student elective to provide spay and neuter services to participating animal shelters that do not have surgical facilities.

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LSU Opens 21st International Exhibition on Animals in Art with Reception

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine opened its 21st International Exhibition on Animals in Art on Saturday, March 29. Dr. Peter F. Haynes, dean of the School of Veterinary Medicine, and members of the SVM Art Show Committee welcomed more than 200 guests into the Veterinary Medicine Library for a first look at the exhibition.

Sue Loubiere, librarian emeritus, was recognized for her 19 years of service to the Animals in Art Exhibition. Former and current deans attending the event are Dean Emeritus Michael G. Groves (dean from (2000-2006), Dean Emeritus William L. Jenkins (1988-1993), Sue Loubiere, Dr. David L. Huxsoll (1995-1999), and Dean Peter F. Haynes (2007-present).

Two hundred and two artists from 40 states, Canada, and Sweden submitted 446 entries for the show. Seventy-five pieces are featured in the exhibition, which continues through April 27 in the Veterinary Medicine Library. Judge and juror for this year’s exhibition is Thomas Livesay, executive director of the LSU Museum of Art. He has served as director of the Whatcom Museum of History & Art in Bellingham, Wash.; director of the Museum of New Mexico in Santa Fe, N.M.; assistant director of the Dallas Museum of Art in Dallas, Texas; director of the Amarillo Art Center in Amarillo, Texas; and director of the Longview Museum & Art Center in Longview, Texas. Livesay received his BFA in 1968 and his MFA in 1972, both from the University of Texas in Austin. He did his post-graduate work in Institute in Arts Administration at Harvard University in 1978. In 2006, Livesay was placed on the Centennial Honor Roll, which recognized him by the American Association of Museums as one of 100 professionals “who have worked during the past 100 years to innovate, improve and expand how museums in the United States serve the public.” In 2007, he received the Edgar L. Hewett Award from the New Mexico Association of Museums. Livesay selected the pieces displayed in the exhibition and 16 award recipients.

Artists in attendance were Linda Ardoin, Baton Rouge, La.; Marsha Barkemeyer, Baton Rouge, La.; Carol Behrmann, Baton Rouge, La.; Bill Bryant, Natchitoches, La.; Monica Freeman, Baton Rouge, La.; Frankie Gould, Livonia, La.; Mary Heckman, Baton Rouge, La.; Elayne Kuehler, Baton Rouge, La.; Brenda LaFleur, Lake Charles, La.; Ralph Marino, Baton Rouge, La.; Joe Panella, Yonkers, N.Y.; Margaret Rice, Baton Rouge, La.; Dr. Ashley Stokes, Baton Rouge, La.; Dana Territo, Baton Rouge, La.; Lydia Wheeler, Baton Rouge, La.; and Zane Zeringue, Norco, La.

The $1,000 Best in Show award went to Monica Freeman from Baton Rouge, La., for her stone and steothite sculpture entitled Feline. Dr. Janis Audin, Chicago, Ill., editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, chose Jane Cozart’s pastel, entitled Woman with Hounds, to appear on a future cover of the journal. The People’s Choice Award will be named at a later date.

            Judge’s Awards were presented for the following pieces:

·         “Spectral Chihuahuas,” Dede LaRue, Denver, Colo., mixed media sculpture;

·         “Big Boys,” Danni Balitsaris-Shobe, Baton Rouge, La., acrylic;

·         “Played Out,” Berry Fritz, McAllen, Texas, oil and linen;

·         “Tess,” Margaret Rice, Baton Rouge, La., oil on board; and

·         “Mangrove Ibis,” Suzie Seerey-Lester, Osprey, Fla., acrylic.

Honorable Mention Awards were presented for the following pieces:

·         “Time to be Moving On,” Eva Stanley, Loveland, Colo., bronze;

·         “Sunrise in the Woods,” Victor Medina, Cold Spring, N.M., photography;

·         “On Target,” Abby Ripley, New Milford, Conn., photography;

·         “Osprey,” Dorie Petrochko, Oxford, Conn., watercolor/gouache;

·         “Grande Aigrette,” Ernie Fournet, New Iberia, La., acrylic;

·         “Striding Tiger,” D.L. Engle, Valinda, Calif., bronze;

·         “The Yogi,” Louise Peterson, Guffey, Colo., bronze;

·         “Mustang I,” Dorothy Shepherd, Sunland, Calif., Chinese brush/ink;

·         “Black and White Tourists Visit Egypt,” Margot Splane, Timmons, Ontario, Canada, handpulled seriagraph; and

·         “Great Grey Owl and Moth,” Cathy Sheeter, Boulder, Colo., scratchboard.

Members of the SVM Art Show Committee are Gretchen Morgan, chair; Dean Peter F. Haynes, Dr. Becky Adcock, Dean Emeritus Michael G. Groves, Ginger Guttner, Christine Mitchell, Frederick Ortner, Michael D. Robinson, Nadine Carter Russell, Dr. David Senior, Tutta Vetter, and Denise Westphal.

Sue Loubiere, librarian emeritus, was recognized for her 19 years of service to the International Animals in Art Exhibition. She was presented with an engraved silver tray by the former and current deans of the School of Veterinary Medicine. During her more than 30 years as librarian, Ms. Loubiere worked for four of the School of Veterinary Medicine’s five deans.

 

The exhibition is open to the public during library hours and will run through April 27. All of the art pieces are for sale, and a 20% commission on each sale goes to the School of Veterinary Medicine. For more information, please contact Gretchen Morgan, coordinator of alumni & public programs, at 225-578-9826 or gmorgan@lsu.edu.
 

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Hill’s LSU SVM Great Rover Road Run Attracts Over 260 Participants

And they’re off!  People and pets participate in the 2008 School of Veterinary Medicine’s Great Rover Road Run.

Two hundred and sixty-one people participated in the Hill’s 15th Annual Great Rover Road Run on March 29 at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine. One hundred and ninety people participated in the one mile fun run/walk, and one hundred and six people ran in the 5K. Once again, this year’s major sponsor was Hill’s Pet Nutrition.

Jonathan Gillis (age 23) was the best overall male runner in the 5K run with a time of 17:36, and Natalie Gillis (age 25) was the best overall female with a time of 19:44. The youngest runner in the 5K run was Shelby Granier (age 9) with a time of 30:28. The oldest runner was Dick Findlay (age 86), who finished with a time of 44:54. In the one mile fun run/walk, Ajax, a 16-pound rat terrier, and his owner Benoit Bordelon were the fastest overall with a time of 5:25.

Proceeds benefited the Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association. The mission of the Hill’s Great Rover Road Run is to spread awareness about the importance of proper nutrition and exercise for animals and the negative side effects of animal obesity. Puppies minus pounds are better!

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LSU Veterinary Ophthalmologist Performs Retinal Reattachment Surgery

In September 2007, Max, a three-year-old Boston Terrier, had his retina reattached by a veterinary ophthalmologist at the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine by Dr. Eric S. Storey, assistant professor of ophthalmology.

Image of Max’s reattached retina.

“Some dog breeds, such as Boston Terriers, Bichons and Shih tzus, are predisposed to retinal detachments,” said Dr. Storey. In Max’s case, this was his second retinal detachment. The first retinal detachment in his right eye was chronic, and the retina had several tears. This second detachment in his left eye was not as severe, making him a good candidate for a successful reattachment.

The procedure is done with the dog lying on his back looking at the ceiling. “An incision is made in the sclera, and three 20-gauge holes or ‘ports’ are made,” said Dr. Storey. “A tube is inserted in one port to deliver fluid that maintains a normal pressure inside the eye. The second port is for a fiber optic light, and the third is for the surgical tools.” The binocular indirect ophthalmomicroscope (BIOM) is a lens system attached to the microscope that allows focus and orientation inside the eye for the surgeon.

“The first step is to remove the vitreous gel, which is usually cloudy and easy to see in these cases,” said Dr. Storey. “The detached retina is usually fluttering in the fluid so it takes great care not to remove the retina with the vitreous.” The back of the eye is shaped like a cup, and the retina is often only attached to the optic nerve in the bottom of the “cup.” The second step is to fill the detached retina beginning right over the optic nerve with perfluorocarbon fluid, which weighs down the retina and lays it against the sclera. The eye is completely filled with perfluorocarbon, which displaces all water outside of the eye through the infusion canula. “Next, a diode laser is used to burn the retina and choroid (the middle, vascular coat of the eye, between the sclera and the retina),” said Dr. Storey. “This makes a scar that will adhere the retina to the choroid over the upcoming days and weeks.”

Silicone oil is then pumped into the back of the eye where it floats on the perfluorocarbon fluid and fills the back of the eye from the lens down. A “flute” needle is placed within the pool of perfluorocarbon liquid and as the eye is pressurized, the perfluorocarbon liquid goes up the needle and drains out of the eye. The last step is to close the three incisions without inducing any bleeding.

“Max was a good candidate for retinal reattachment because the detachment was partial, spontaneous, and had only recently occurred,” said Dr. Storey. “If the retina is partially detached or only detached for a few days or weeks, the reattachment is more likely to be successful, and the dog will very likely be able to see again.” Partial detachments in the top half of the retina always progress to a complete retinal detachment over time, and this type of retinal surgery can intervene to prevent blindness where other techniques fail. In cases where a complete retinal detachment is weeks to months old, the rods and cones within the eye can degrade, causing the return of vision to take longer. In very prolonged cases, vision may never return despite reattachment of the retina.

It is more common to see cases where the retina is detached due to other eye problems. In these cases, the detachment is often a result of cataracts or develops after cataract surgery. “Though these cases are more complex, and the success rate is lower, these animals would remain blind without retinal reattachment surgery,” said Dr. Storey. “One of our future goals with retinal surgery is to be able to treat horses with reattachment surgery the same way we treat dogs.”

To determine the success of a reattachment, Dr. Storey uses a maze created out of interlocking foam walls. The dog is sent through the maze to determine how well his vision has been restored. “In Max’s case, his vision continues to be fabulous,” said Dr. Storey.

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Hosted 4,600 Visitors at 26th Annual Open House

Gretchen Henry, a third-year veterinary student, explains to a group of Open House visitors how the School of Veterinary Medicine’s equine treadmill is used for research.

Approximately 4,600 visitors toured the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine at its 26th Annual Open House on March 1. This year’s theme is Veterinarians in the Community: Global Ambassadors. Open House is an opportunity for everyone in the family to explore the fantastic world of veterinary medicine and the latest developments in animal health care, welfare, and research.

A self-guided tour took visitors through the Veterinary Medicine Building where students, faculty and staff provided information and exhibits on various facets of the veterinary medicine curriculum. There were 70 exhibits, and many were interactive, including a bone pit, where visitors could unearth bones, and a radiology exhibit that asked visitors to identify radiographs (X-rays) and CAT scans.

Special features included tours of the Cancer Treatment Unit, the equine treadmill, the underwater treadmill, and the petting zoo. Many children brought their teddy bears and stuffed animals to Teddy Bear Repair, where veterinary students performed “surgery” on the toys and repaired them for their owners. There were also animal demonstrations, including a parade of breeds for both dogs and horses, as well as education presentations about common household toxins and veterinary education and careers. Also participating in Open House were some of the School’s educational animals, including Morgan, a red tailed hawk, and Squirt, a screech owl.

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Released Rehabilitated Bald Eagle

An adult bald eagle was presented to the Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana on January 3, 2008, after being found on the ground in Lafourche Parish and unable to fly. Examination by veterinarians at the School of Veterinary Medicine’s Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana revealed that the eagle was dehydrated but had no other apparent injuries.

A rehabilitated bald eagle was released at the Brownell Memorial Park & Carillon Tower in Morgan City, La., on February 20.

(Click photo to play video [25Mb] of release.)

Extensive diagnostic tests revealed some intestinal parasites, as well as a possible fracture of the right clavicle. The radiographs (x-rays) also showed that this eagle was illegally shot at some time, but it is unclear whether that was related to its current presentation. After medical stabilization, an exploratory surgery was performed to determine if the clavicle was indeed fractured and to repair it if needed. The surgery did not reveal a fracture, and the eagle recovered well from the procedure. By January 24, 2008, the surgical incision had healed, and the eagle was responding well to supportive therapy needed to give it strength. The eagle was transferred to Wings of

Hope Wildlife Sanctuary for rehabilitation and flight training. The eagle has remained there and is now ready for release.

The eagle was released at the Brownell Memorial Park & Carillon Tower (3359 Hwy 70) in Morgan City, La., on Wednesday, February 20 at 10:30 a.m. Dr. Javier Nevarez, director of the LSU SVM’s Wildlife Hospital of Louisiana, opened the transport carrier and released the eagle, which quickly took to the sky.

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LSU Veterinary School to Host Small Animal Medicine Symposium

On April 27, the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine will host its Small Animal Medicine Symposium, which this year will focus on infectious diseases of dogs and cats. This event is made possible by a generous grant from Pfizer Animal Health and will feature Dr. Edward Breitschwerdt, professor of internal medicine at the North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine as a guest speaker. Dr. Breitschwerdt will discuss the molecular diagnosis of infectious diseases, persistent blood-borne infection, vector-borne infections and canine bartonellosis.

Other topics will include canine ehrlichiosis and anaplasmosis, methicillin-resistant staphylococci, mycoses, canine leptospirosis, endocarditis, American trypanosomiasis and challenging infectious disease cases. Speakers from the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine are Drs. Mark Acierno, assistant professor of companion animal medicine; Susan Eddlestone, assistant professor of veterinary medicine; Frederic Gaschen, associate professor of companion animal medicine and small animal medicine service chief; Amy Grooters, associate professor of companion animal medicine; Romain Pariaut, assistant professor of veterinary cardiology; Kirk Ryan, assistant professor of veterinary medicine; Keith Strickland, clinical associate professor of veterinary cardiology; Joseph Taboada, professor of veterinary medicine and associate dean for student and academic affairs; and Deidre Vaughan, dermatology resident.

Eight hours of continuing education credit or 0.8 CEU credits (one hour equals 0.1 CE unit) will be earned for this course. Certification forms will be provided for participants to complete credit hours earned.

Thanks to an educational grant from Pfizer Animal Health, sole sponsor of the 2008 Small Animal Internal Medicine Symposium, registrations received by April 23, 2008, will be complimentary. An administrative fee of $25 will be charged for registrations received after April 23 and for on-site registrations. Lunch, coffee breaks and proceedings are included. Cancellations should be made to the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine in a timely manner as space is limited.

For registration information, contact the LSU School of Veterinary Medicine at (225) 578-9900, or go to the SVM website at www.vetmed.lsu.edu. The registration brochure is available for download on the Continuing Education page. 

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LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Hosts 26th Annual Open House Saturday, March 1

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine will host its 26th Annual Open House on Saturday, March 1, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  The event is free and open to the public. This year’s theme is Veterinarians in the Community: Global Ambassadors. Open House 2008 is an opportunity for everyone in the family to explore the fantastic world of veterinary medicine and the latest developments in animal health care, welfare, and research. 

A self-guided tour will take visitors through the Veterinary Medicine Building where students, faculty and staff will provide information and exhibits on various facets of the veterinary medicine curriculum. In addition, the Cancer Treatment Unit, the gross anatomy laboratory, intensive care units, surgery suites and radiology suites will be featured on the tour, along with other areas of the veterinary hospital, like the underwater treadmill for dogs and the equine treadmill. There will also be animal demonstrations, such as a parade of breeds of both dogs and horses.

Equine treadmill demonstrations will be held throughout the day behind the Equine Research Building. Also continuing throughout the day are the companion animal underwater treadmill demonstrations at the CARe-Center and tours of the Cancer Treatment Unit in the Small Animal Clinic.

Emelie McClellan and Cynthia Albert, third-year veterinary students and event chairs; and SVM faculty and staff will be available for live interviews throughout the day.

For more information, call Gretchen Morgan at (225) 578-9900 or visit the Open House page at http://www.vetmed.lsu.edu/open_house.htm.

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Fight Animal Obesity at the Hill’s LSU SVM Great Rover Road Run

LSU School of Veterinary Medicine Hosts Annual Run Benefiting the Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The LSU School of Veterinary Medicine is hosting the Hill’s 15th Annual Great Rover Road Run on Saturday, March 29. The Hill’s Great Rover Road Run consists of a 5K Road Run and a one mile Fun Run/Walk with Rover.  This year’s major sponsor is Hill’s Pet Nutrition.

The 5K run begins at 8:00 a.m., and the one mile Fun Run begins at 9:00 a.m. at the School on Skip Bertman Drive. The scenic course starts at the School and winds through the LSU campus. 

Every participant will get a t-shirt and "doggy bag." Water and refreshments will be provided for all participants. There will be also be a low cost dog wash available after the races. 

Awards will be given to the first-, second-, and third-place winners in the different age categories for the 5K run and to the winners of the different categories for the one mile Fun Run. Canine competitions after the races will include Best Dressed Pet and Best Owner/Pet Look Alike, IQ test, longest tail contest, and more! There is a $5 entry fee for these events for non-race participants.

Several local non-profit organizations will be present passing out information, and clubs will be set up to sell different items such as water bottles, gourmet dog treats, bandanas.

To pre-register, please contact the School at 225-578-9900 to request a registration form, or click here for more information and to download the registration form. You may also register on-site on the day of the run. The pre-registration fee for the 5K run and the one-mile Fun Run is $15 each, or $20 to participate in both races (pre-registration deadline is March 16). The registration fee on race day is $17 each for the 5K run and the Fun Run, or $24 for both races. If you pre-register, you can pick up your pre-race packet in the lobby of the School of Veterinary Medicine on March 23 from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Dog participants must be on a six-foot leash (not a retractable leash). Please do not bring female dogs if they are in heat. Dog participants must have proof of current vaccination and may be excluded if they are aggressive. No dogs will be allowed on the 5K course with competitive runners.

Proceeds benefit the Student Chapter of the American Veterinary Medical Association. The mission of the Hill’s Great Rover Road Run is to spread awareness about the importance of proper nutrition and exercise for animals and the negative side effects of animal obesity. Puppies minus pounds are better! 

 




LSU School of Veterinary Medicine
Skip Bertman Drive • Baton Rouge, LA 70803
Telephone: 225-578-9900 • Fax: 225-578-9916 • E-mail: svmweb@vetmed.lsu.edu

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